Our Top 5 Wingspan European Expansion Cards

Best Wingspan European Expansion Cards

Wondering what the best Wingspan European Expansion cards are? After hundreds of hours of gameplay, we list our top 5 Wingspan European Expansion cards below. But first, a little about the expansion itself for those that may be new here…

Released on November 29, 2019, the European Expansion adds 81 beautiful birds from Europe to the game. (When we say beautiful, we mean it; the artwork is stunning!) It is the first expansion to the Wingspan board game, the second being the Oceania Expansion.

Exciting new features in this expansion include:

  • 81 European Bird Cards with New Abilities
  • 4 Automa Cards
  • 5 New Bonus Cards
  • 5 New End-of-Round Goal Tiles
  • 15 Purple Egg Miniatures
  • 38 Food Tokens
  • Colorful New Scorepad: Multi-Player and Single Player Scoring
  • Additional Storage Tray

All the new Wingspan goodies work with the base game and all future expansions.

Here are our Top 5 Wingspan European Expansion Cards

#5: Moltoni’s Warbler/White Wagtail/Yellowhammer

With a bit of micromanagement, these passive birds let you play an extra bird at the end of each round. This essentially gives you up to a net of three free action cubes (to play birds; you spend an action to play the one of these birds to begin with), which is the game’s most valuable resource. There aren’t any discounts associated with this, so you’re still on the hook for all that food and those eggs. They aren’t that impressive without their power, although White Wagtail can hold a decent amount of eggs (five), making it a good egg bank.

Anything that costs zero food, such as Vultures, the “play on top” predators, or the “tuck to play” predators make an amazing combo with this bird’s power when resources are tight. Dropping a California Condor at the end of the fourth round is also a great chance to pick up a choice bonus card when you don’t have any food left. If you can make effective use of this power early, it can give you a substantial advantage over your opponents.

See these posts for more on these birds:

Discover What Makes a Top Tier Bird Card in Wingspan

Wingspan Teal Powers: Discover How All 20 Teal Powered Bird Cards Rank

 

Best Wingspan European Expansion Cards: Moltoni's Warbler, White Wagtail, Yellowhammer

 

#4: Audouin’s Gull

This unique “tuck/draw” bird is a standout card for its ability to draw two cards before tucking one. It’s important to note that this bird’s power will work perfectly even if you have zero cards in hand. Other tuck/draw birds require you to tuck a card before drawing a card.

This is essentially an evolution of the Ruddy Duck/Pied Billed Grebe/Common Yellowthroat archetype when you think about it. The Audouin’s Gull lets you draw two cards, but instead of discarding one, you tuck one and gain a point in the process!

Best Wingspan European Expansion Cards: Audouin's Gull

 

#3: Common Chiffchaff

This “mass tucking” bird is one of a few that broke the mold for what tuckers could do in Wingspan. Unlike its aqua-phobic buddy, Common Chaffinch, this ravenous devourer of cards can live in the Wetlands buffet line. The highest scoring tucking engines probably have this bird on the board.

See these posts for more on these birds:

Discover What Makes a Top Tier Bird Card in Wingspan

The Power of Tucking Cards in  Wingspan

Best Wingspan European Expansion Cards: Common Chiffchaff

 

#2: Black Redstart/Lesser Whitethroat

Optimizing this teal power takes some micromanagement, but the payoff is frequently worth it. You have to play your whole game thinking about how to get the most out of this power. It’s realistic to approach fifteen points scored through eggs if played in round one (but you’re probably spending most of these eggs).

Although it is worth zero points, Black Redstart has the added bonus of being a decent egg bank with its four egg start nest and it plays better with bonus cards. This comes at the cost of three food. Lesser Whitethroat is worth zero points and only has a two-egg nest, so it’s pretty worthless unless you get some mileage out of its power (thankfully it’s easier to get onto the board with a lower food cost).

Redstart qualifies for twelve bonus cards and Whitestart qualifies for seven, which are respectable numbers. The power of these two birds pairs very well with Oologist in particular. It’s a great feeling to drop five eggs at the end of round four and max out that bonus. Passive egg-laying, especially of this caliber, is a huge game-changer in the Oceania Expansion metagame.

See these posts for more on these birds:

Discover What Makes a Top Tier Bird Card in Wingspan

Wingspan Teal Powers: Discover How All 20 Teal Powered Bird Cards Rank

Top Wingspan European Expansion Cards: Black Redstart and Lesser Whitethroat

 

#1: Bonelli’s Eagle/Eastern Imperial Eagle

These big eagles redefined the term “point bomb,” coming in at ten to eleven gross points respectively (when their power is utilized); even more with Rodentologist and/or Falconer! Vultures are jealous of these “tuck to play” birds because their “zero food cost” impacts the game in a major way and in a single action, no less.

Wetland engines love these birds because they can easily swoop into underdeveloped habitats without any regard for food. These birds are simply amazing when dropped at the end of a round off the back of a Yellowhammer, Moltoni’s Warbler, or White Wagtail.

See these posts for more on these birds:

Discover What Makes a Top Tier Bird Card in Wingspan

The Power of Tucking Cards in  Wingspan

Best Wingspan European Expansion Cards to play: Eastern Imperial Eagle and Bonelli's Eagle

 

That’s my top 5 cards from the Wingspan European Expansion; what are yours? Let us know in the comments!

2 Comments

  1. Paul

    What about the ruff which let’s you tuck up to three cards at the end of each round and get three new ones .That seems pretty good.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *